Tag Archives: Museum

Berlin Field Studies: Reflections on Teaching a Course On-Site

Leading a discussion at the Karl Liebknecht Memorial.

Leading a discussion at the Karl Liebknecht Memorial.

This summer I had the opportunity to teach one of the University of Maryland’s field studies courses, entitled “Berlin: Its History and its Art.” Teaching in Europe I have taken students on plenty of cultural excursions, but this was the first time in my career that I had had the opportunity to organize an entire course on location. The experience was a very positive one, not in the least because I was fortunate to work with students who brought an incredible amount of energy and intellectual curiosity to the class. At the same time, a course of this kind poses a number of challenges, both of a logistical and of a pedagogical kind. I lived in Berlin for two years, and so it is a place that I am very familiar with, the town’s well-deserved reputation for constant transformation notwithstanding. Teaching a course in and on the city, however, meant approaching the place from a fresh perspective, and I will reflect on all of that here.

Designing the Course

Course description and learning objectives were set, as “Berlin: Its History and its Art” were part of the program’s stable of field study courses, but the concept and the syllabus were up to me. The course had to be more than a glorified guided tour, and certainly not a pretext for soaking up the aura of the city, rather, it had to be as intellectually challenging as any classroom-based seminar. And because of the course title, we had a dual mandate: the class was both a course in history and art history. At the same time, I wanted to critically interrogate course title, that there was such a thing as “Berlin’s art,” given that some of the most spectacular art in Berlin is not from Berlin at all. The bust of Nefertiti, which we saw, is perhaps the most celebrated instance of a work of art that reflects a problematic history, but we are confronted with similar questions in regards to the Pergamonmuseum, the Ethnological Museum (now in the middle of relocating to the Humboldt-Forum), and much else in the State Museums.

To bring both sides together, I built the class around the theoretical question of how a city’s history and identity is expressed or, as is more often the case, constructed through its art, architecture, and public spaces, which I then broke down into daily themes: “The Architecture of Absolutism” for our Potsdam excursion, or “Colonial Legacies and the Berlin State Museums” for our visit to the Ethnological Museum and the Museum Island.

I prepared some readings on Berlin history for the students to cover ahead of time. The week before the meeting in Berlin was designated for reading. In order to give them the time to dive into a specific period in more depth, I asked each student to take responsibility for a certain period and report on the key developments and their significance for the history of the city.

In order to further ensure that I was not the only person with the content knowledge, I asked each student to prepare an on-site presentation for key structures and places. Public speaking is not everybody’s favorite thing, but the stakes were low and the students had a good esprit de corps, and I was quite hearted to see how supportive they were of each other.

Berlin as a Classroom

In addition to the historical readings, I found a few useful online resources that provided for the students a basic crash course in art history and criticism. A shoutout here especially to the incredibly useful smarthistory.org. We began our first class practicing art criticism with a few artistic depictions of Berlin from Eduard Gaertner’s more realist painting of Unter den Linden to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner’s Berlin street scenes. Including the Kirchner was also an opportunity to rehearse the development of the historical avant garde. Doing so was a chance for me to clear the air: the Hamburger Bahnhof was on the agenda, and I know that expressionist, abstract, or non-representative art can divide a room, and I wanted the students to approach the works with at least an understanding of their art historical contexts.

The biggest challenge were the variables involved in being in any city, especially one like Berlin. Some of my information was out of date; I realized too late, for instance, that you couldn’t just show up and be let in to the top of the Reichstag like you could in the past. Unfortunately for a course called “Berlin: Its History and its Art,” the museums are also undergoing a major phase of moving and renovation (as they have since the 1990s). The Neue Nationalgalerie is closed until 2019, and all I knew of what was on display was that a few things were in the Hamburger Bahnhof. Regrettably, I had no opportunity to preview the collections beforehand, so when we got to the Hamburger Bahnhof, I had the students look around a couple of galleries so that I could run through and see what was on display, then reconvene. The specific works I had wanted them to see were not out, instead they had an exhibition on the Degenerate Art exhibition. So I made up a lesson on the Degenerate Art exhibition on the spot.

The Upshot

I left Berlin satisfied with how things had gone down. Reading the papers two weeks later, I was pleased to see that the students were actively incorporating the methods for analyzing art and architecture that we had practiced in our morning seminars and on-site over the course of the week, and generating numerous original insights. I was delighted to read extraordinarily creative essays that expanded on the course’s original concept to think about various pieces of street art that the students had spotted, thorny issues of memory and memorials (an issue near and dear to the hearts of my military-affiliated students), as well as squatter culture, a topic students were surely moved to consider given that our hotel was located up the street from one of Berlin’s remaining squatter settlements.

The reactions of the students to various places and works that we encountered meant led to plenty of surprises and teaching moments for me. This is, of course, always the case when one teaches material for the first time, but being on-site introduced a wider range of variables into the mix. Many of them only grew to love the city over the course of the week, as some were genuinely surprised by the German capital’s grittiness. Having already been thoroughly sold on Berlin before I ever arrived there, if anything I went through a reverse process of learning to see the city and its culture with a more critical eye than I did at the beginning of my first exchange year. I was especially charmed by the way the students reacted to the art museums. Their excitement over seeing an original Picasso took me back to when I was eighteen years old and stood rapturously before the canonical works of art in the National Gallery in London or the Louvre.

A few final points on what worked, and what I intend to incorporate next time.

  • Use of maps. In spite of my students’ joke that they were my ducklings, it was important to me to be sure that I spent ample time orienting them on where they had been and what they had done. I frequently stopped before city maps in the mass transit system to point to where we had been and where we were going. The first seminar also included a detailed study of the city map and a discussion of how to use the mass transit system.
  • Cultural scaffolding. There were a few moments of cross-cultural misunderstanding that I will be sure to prep the students on next time. How to tip in Germany was something students were unsure about, for instance. Some students are also unaware of the taboo (and more generally the laws regarding) photographing interesting people on the street. One student had a mildly embarrassing encounter over photography, which they resolved peacefully and with grace, much to their credit.
  • Social media. My students took the initiative to correspond over Facebook. While my social media presence is curated with students in mind, I still believe in maintaining digital boundaries, especially online. In this case students organized themselves. Some expressed the wish that I had taken this on in order to facilitate travel arrangements, a thought that admittedly had not occurred to me. Whether I would want to bend my practice and facilitate organization over Facebook is a matter I will have to consider. Brent Foster’s essay on Chronicle Vitae this week gets at the possibilities and pitfalls of venturing into that territory with my field study groups.

Photos used with permission.

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Leading my students down the Straße des 17. Juni.

Jünger-Haus als Museum

Das Ernst-Jünger-Haus wird nach jahrelanger Restaurierung Jünger-Fans aus aller Welt als Museum zugänglich gemacht. Die FAZ hat einige interessante Überlegungen zu diesem “Haus letzter Hand” heute veröffentlicht.  Der Artikel ist lesenswert, nicht nur wegen des Bildes der unheimlichen Büste Jüngers, die offensichtlich zu den Sehenswürdigkeiten im Jünger-Haus in Wilfingen zählt.

Kostenlose Donnerstags in den staatlichen Museen zu Berlin

Die momentan herrschende Sparpolitik geht leider voran.  Erst vor kurzem habe ich erfahren, dass kostenloser Eintritt Donnerstag Abends in die staatlichen Museen zu Berlin seit über einem Monat Geschichte ist.  Das ist ja nicht nur ein bedauerliches Zeichen anhaltender finanzieller Schwierigkeiten sowie ein Verlust für alle Berliner, sondern auch ein Hinweis auf die Gefahren kultureller und geisteswissenschaftlicher Einrichtungen in den Ländern, wo Sparen hoch auf der Tagesordnung steht.  Es hat sich angeblich herausgestellt, dass Touristen, “die als leistungsfähigeres Publikum geltend dürfen” zunehmend das Angebot nutzten.

Die guten Nachrichten sind, dass jetzt Jugendliche bis zum vollendeten 18. Lebensjahr jeden Tag kostenlosen Eintritt gewährt wird.  Uns alten armen Kunstfreunde hilft das zwar nicht viel.  Für mich persönlich ist das ja bedauerlich, denn als ich in Berlin lebte war es für mich eine Art Tradition, Donnerstag Abends in den Museen zu verbringen.  Ich bin oft dahingegangen, manchmal bloß für eine Stunde oder zwei, um meine Lieblingsstücke oder interessante Artefakten zu betrachten.  Jahreskarten sind glücklicherweise nicht so teuer, der Preis einer solchen für Daueraustellungen beträgt nur 40 Euro, und wenn ich wieder in Berlin bin, werde ich mir wohl eine besorgen, dann könnte ich jederzeit ins Museum gehen.  Aber es kommt eigentlich nicht darauf an, was ich mir selber leisten kann.  Es kommt darauf an, dass der staatliche Kulturbesitz allen zugänglich ist.  Einige kostenlose Stunden sind wirklich nicht zu viel gefragt, und somit muss Kultur nicht unbedint nur denjenigen offen stehen, die das Geld hergeben kann.  Schade ist es auch, dass nur an das Touristengeld wird hier gedacht, als stellten die kostenlosen Abends eine Geschäftsgelegenheit dar, die man noch nicht gezapft hätte.  Eben das ist das Besorgniserregende an die Änderungen der Eintrittspreiseregelungen.